Madeira and the eternal spring!

Most people who visit Madeira find that this island has just about the most perfect climate in the world.

The warm ocean currents influence the climate and mean an absence of extreme hot or cold temperatures, determining a pleasant, mild climate all year long. In general, April to September is mostly dry, whilst October to March is fairly wet. The water temperature remains very pleasant all year round, ranging between 19°C/66°F (winter) and 24°C/75°F (summer). The best month to swim in the sea is in September, when the average sea temperature is 24°C (75°F).

Generally, in summer (June – September) the average daily temperatures are around 24°C (76°F), with frequent sunny days and clear skies, but temperatures up to and above 30°C (86°F) are not uncommon, especially if the hot winds from North Africa are present. At the other end of the scale, the daily low temperatures don’t tend to drop far below the high teens (66-67°F), even at night. Overall, summer temperatures are generally very comfortable, with cooling sea breezes usually ensuring relief from any scorching weather. Rainfall is very low throughout summer.

The weather remains warm throughout autumn, although there is an increased chance of rain and storms. October and November still see daily high temperatures averaging around 23°C (73°F) and daily low temperatures averaging around 17°C (63°F) – that’s significantly warmer than the UK in the height of summer! Temperatures in the high 20s (82-85°F) are not unheard of at this time of year. Autumn is a great time to visit Madeira, when the temperatures are warm and because all the kids are back at school, the whole island is quiet.

It’s difficult to describe any period in Madeira as ‘winter’, since daytime temperatures are frequently around 20°C (68°F) and almost never fall below 10°C (50°F). Even the daytime excursion is minimal: the difference between day and night is about 5°C (2.7°F). There is still a healthy average of six sunshine hours every day during winter, which means you’ll definitely be going home with a golden tan, if that’s what you’re after.

The mountainous nature of the main island of Madeira creates a number of micro climates, with different parts of the island experiencing different types of weather. Quinta do Lorde is usually slightly sunnier and dryer than other regions, as it is well sheltered by the mountains and cliffs from Ponta Sao Lourenço to Caniçal.